Saturday, April 14, 2012

Voices Demons use sucker demons to deform, bore holes in skull

Every night for at least 6 months, spider-like sucker demons have been 'biting' the same spot on the back of my head with a needle-like appendage that feels like it penetrates through the skin, as described in [blog]. They are a cross between the 'eye spiders' presented in [blog] and the snake-like sucker demons presented on this blog.

The Voices Demons order them to do this, and they claim that they are creating a hole in my brain, similar to a lobotomy or the holes left by certain kinds of illegal street drugs. They call it, "masturbating a hole in [my] 'noggin."

The effects are now visible on the surface of my scalp, where the skin is scabbed and burnt:

The drill site, which is surrounded by deformities in the topography of my skull

Sucker demons deform skeletal tissue when anchored to body

Sucker demons' frequent and prolonged anchoring to my skull caused deformities
Surrounding the location of the drill site, for lack of a better term, are deformities in the once-smooth topography of my skull, which were visible in less than six months time.

These are not the only abnormalities in my skull. Cartilage has been removed from my nose, nerves have been damaged or cut in my face, muscle tissue has been degraded in key areas on my face (apparently, these creatures break muscle down somehow—probably by cutting nerves), and holes have already been drilled in my eye sockets. Scars from surgical incisions—from surgeries I know nothing about—can be found inside my noise, mouth and eye sockets.

They have also, just to be themselves (or, "make a point"), removed a childhood dog-bite scar from around my mouth, replaced it with a different looking one, and then put it back again, multiple times.

Once, they told me to look in the mirror; when I did, had hair one minute, but not the next. Nearly six years later, I found out that the hairs were individual sucker demons.

TIP | Blending Quicktime Video Layers to Penetrate Demon Cloaks

NOTE | This post is unfinished, but should provide enough information for even a novice to use effectively. Check back for updates.

SEE ALSO | Read Blending Quicktime video layers perfect contrast in low-light environments for tips on brightening videos shot in near-darkness without altering its realism.

The same video-filtering technique used in law enforcement surveillance cameras can be employed for the purposes of capturing hard-to-see demonic activity using Quicktime layer blending.

Capturing demons on camera is a near impossible challenge to overcome due, in part, to their physical attributes and abilities and other characteristics which they use to avoid such detection. There are several factors that make it almost impossible to capture on camera what you can see with your own eyes. These are three of those factors that the video technique discussed in this post helps to circumvent:
  • Speed. Some demons move quickly, particularly the smaller variety, some of which actually move into a different time flow when they move (this is part-and-parcel to their cloaking ability). In Demonic Peep-Eye, a small (uncloaked) demon can be seen running lightning fast up to a small hole drilled in a lid, mounted over the lens of my camera. After peeping inside, he speeds off at a rate so fast that only a few frames capture his image. If it hadn't been for its curiosity, I am sure I would never know this demon exists.
  • Camouflage. Demons can blend (or camouflage) with almost any object that even remotely resembles, from any angle, a part of their body, their clothing, or overall body shape. In Blanket demon blends face with bedspread, the blanket demon superimposes a semi-transparent version of his face over a ruffled bedspread, which had been slowly molded into various features of his face; in Spectre of Death blends with shadow and window shade, the Spectre of Death blends the white features of his head with the white window shades, and his black cloak with the shadow underneath. For a full discussion of demonic blending, read Demon camouflaging illustrated in Chico o Vieja.
  • Transparency and darkness. Demons almost invariably appear in the dark—at least the ones that I have met—and are usually cloaked (or semi-transparent), as well. In Sucker Demon, Cloaked (below), a sucker demon slinks down the back of my head and neck in a partially cloaked state. You can barely see it in the unfiltered video; but, with the technique described in this post, you can see it quite readily.

Change the Graphics Mode property to notPatXor of the original video layer

Add a new layer below the original and change its Blending Mode property to blend
NOTE | Set the Transparency property of each layer to 100%.
Sometimes, this technique also reveals demons that are blending with other objects, as shown below:

A demon of the white-masked, black-cloaked variety blends seamlessly with my hand and cellphone—while it's moving

The original (unfiltered) still frame
The above example is not just a coincidence, as the demon appears in every single frame my hand and cellphone does (view left-to-right, top-to-bottom):

Now that a hidden demon has been found, a variety of demon can be labeled because there is an existing photo of an identical-looking demon:

The demon in this photograph was compared to the one above,
resulting in a determination that these two demons are of the same variety.
The video's distinct rendering of the demon's features clearly define it as the variety of demon, above, in they both wear black cloaks, stand about 3 to 4.5" feet high, and wear garish white masks.

Before, with just the one photo, it could not be determined whether the lone demon was unique among all other demons, or whether it was one among many. Now, it could be that there are only two; but, based on my experience, similarly dressed demons that are the same shape and size generally are many. (If, however, the demon isn't dressed in something ceremonial or formal or uniform-like—and you haven't seen any others like it before—then it is probably one of kind).
NOTE | It is possible that the white masks are actually faces.
In the meantime, you can view the movie file to which the cloak-penetrating technique was applied; and, here's a couple of photos of both the original and post-processed movie and screen shots of the Quicktime video layer and blending mode settings, as applied in MetaHoot, a metadata property editor for Quicktime movies (available for Mac OS X only).

Transfer Modes
The term transfer mode may be considered as a generic term encompassing three different transfer mode types. Each has to do with the way source pixels interact with destination pixels during drawing, painting, erasing, filling, and copying operations. The three types of transfer mode are as follows:
  • Boolean Pattern Mode. Boolean pattern modes apply to line drawing, framing, painting, erasing, and filling operations. 
  • Boolean Source Mode. Boolean source modes apply to text drawing and copying operations. 
  • Arithmetic Source Mode. Arithmetic source modes apply to drawing (including text drawing), painting, and copying operations.

Boolean Source Modes
The Boolean source modes are the equivalent in text drawing and copying to the Boolean pattern mode used for non-text drawing, painting, filling, and erasing operations.
The relevant constants are srcCopy, srcOr, srcXor, srcBic, notSrcCopy, notSrcOr, notSrcXor, and notSrcBic. The additional non-standard mode grayishTextOr is useful for drawing text in deactivated or disabled user interface objects. (This mode is considered non-standard because it is not stored in pictures and printing with it is undefined.)
srcCopy
If the source is black, apply the foreground color to the destination; if the source is white, apply the background color; otherwise apply weighted portions of the foreground and background colors.
srcOr
If the source is black, apply the foreground color to the destination; if the source is white, do nothing; otherwise apply weighted portions of the foreground color.
srcXor
If the source is black, invert the destination (this operation is undefined for a colored destination). Otherwise, do nothing.
srcBic
If the source is black, apply the background color to the destination. If the source is white, do nothing. Otherwise, apply weighted portions of the background color.
notSrcCopy
If the source is white, apply the foreground color to the destination; if the source is black, apply the background color; otherwise apply weighted portions of the foreground and background colors.
notSrcOr
If the source is white, apply the foreground color to the destination; if the source is black, do nothing; otherwise apply weighted portions of the foreground color.
notSrcXor
If the source is white, invert the destination (this operation is undefined for a colored destination pixel). Otherwise, do nothing.
notSrcBic
If the source is white, apply the background color to the destination. If the source is black, do nothing. Otherwise, apply weighted portions of the background color.
Boolean Pattern Modes
Pattern modes may be set as pen transfer modes in the graphics port using the PenMode function. The modes are represented by eight constants, each of which relates to a specific Boolean operation (COPY, OR, XOR, and BIC (for bit clear)) and their inverse variants.
The effects of these modes are best explained assuming a 1-bit (black-and-white) environment in which the foreground colour is black and the background colour is white. The following lists the pattern modes and describes the effect of source pixels on destination pixels in such an environment.
Pattern Mode
Action On Destination Pixel
If source pixel is black
If source pixel is white
patCopy
Apply foreground colour.
Apply background colour.
patOr
Apply foreground colour.
Leave alone.
patXor
Invert.
Leave alone.
patBic
Apply background colour.
Leave alone.
notPatCopy
Apply background colour.
Apply foreground colour.
notPatOr
Leave alone.
Force black.
notPatXor
Leave alone.
Invert.
notPatBic
Leave alone.
Apply background colour.

These effects are illustrated at Fig 4. Note particularly that patCopy causes the destination pixels to be completely over-written. patCopy is the transfer mode initially set in the graphics port.

12image04.gif



Text dimming
grayishTextOr
Dim the destination. If in color, replace it with a blend of the foreground and background; if black-and-white, replace it with dithered black and white. This mode is used primarily for text.

Highlighting
Highlighting
hilite
Replace the background color with the highlight color.
hilitetransfermode
Replace the background color with the highlight color.

Arithmetic Source Modes
Arithmetic source modes may be set in the graphics port, and may be passed as parameters in QuickDraw functions for copying pixel images.
Arithmetic source modes perform arithmetic operations on the values of the red, green and blue components of the source and destination pixels. Because they work with RGB colours rather than colour table indexes, arithmetic transfer modes produce predictable results on indexed devices. The arithmetic source modes and their effects in a colour environment are as follows:

Constant
Value
Description
blend
32
Destination pixel is replaced with a blend of the source and destination pixel colours. Revert to srcCopy mode if the destination is a bitmap or 1-bit pixel image.
addPin
33
Destination pixel is replaced with the sum of the source and destination pixel colours up to a maximum allowable value. Revert to srcBic mode if the destination is a bitmap or 1-bit pixel image.
addOver
34
Destination pixel is replaced with the sum of the source and destination pixel colours, but if the value of the red, green or blue component exceeds 65,536, then subtract 65,536 from that value. Revert to srcXor mode if the destination is a bitmap or 1-bit pixel image.
subPin
35
Destination pixel is replaced with the difference of the source and destination pixel colours, but not less than a minimum allowable value. Revert to srcOr mode if the destination is a bitmap or 1-bit pixel image.
transparent
36
Source and destination pixel are replaced with the source pixel if the source pixel is not equal to the background colour.
addMax
37
Destination pixel is replaced with the colour containing the greater saturation of each of the RGB components of the source and destination pixels. Revert to srcBic mode if the destination is a bitmap or 1-bit pixel image.
subOver
38
Destination pixel is replaced with the difference of the source and destination pixel colours, but if the value of the red, green or blue is less than 0, add the negative result to 65,536. Revert to srcXor mode if the destination is a bitmap or 1-bit pixel image.
adMin
39
Destination pixel is replaced with the colour containing the lesser saturation of each of the RGB components of the source and destination pixels. Revert to srcOr mode if the destination is a bitmap or 1-bit pixel image.

Add Dithering to Transfer Modes
ditherCopy
Replace the destination with a dither mix of the source and destination.

Transparent mode
transparent
Replace the destination with the source if the source is not equal to the background. 

Nature of the Demon Cloak Revealed

A demon's cloak is always partially visible to varying degrees, and how well a demon can cloak is determined by two factors: the variety of demonic entity they belong to and their individual capabilities, such as size and mental acuity. For example:
  • The larger a demon is, the easier it is to see, no matter what variety it is (however, it may still be relatively undetectable, due to each varieties' ability to cloak); and,
  • If a demon is caught off-guard or is evading a fast-moving camera, the visibility of their cloak is greater due to the distraction caused by a shift in focus from cloaking to evading.
The latter suggests that cloaking is initiated and maintained in the mind. Another factor that suggests that a cloak is a biological function in nature is that the cloak of each demon variety looks different.

Here's a list of demonic entities, followed by the appearance of their cloaks:
  • The white-masked demons in black cloaks (as well a particular variety of the human-looking demons) are almost completely invisible, but can be seen when the light reflecting off of them is bent (or filtered) before it reaches your eyes or a camera. Since that only happens when they (and/or you) are in fast motion, a camera—and not the eye—is the only way to see one of these when cloaked; and, even then, you have to know where they are and where they're headed. In other words, it's a once-in-a-lifetime thing that you catch an image of one.
This image was captured when I accidentally took a picture while walking fast and carrying a camera at the same time
A demon's arm is shown in a still frame from a video in fast motion, reaching for me from around a corner in my home
  • The Jawa-looking demons in black cloaks of the glowing-eyes variety, and the kind that wear the garish white masks, are completely invisible, except for their blur of motion, unless you capture them with a camera medium that is sensitive to the type of radiation they emit; and, because they move so fast, only fast-motion photography—or a photo at just the right moment (see below)—can hope to capture them. Even still, I was able to capture one still frame of this type of demon, while cloaked and in motion; like all other demons emitting radiation, it looks cartoonish (or over saturated in color:
    • The similar-looking—but otherwise very different—white-masked variety of this demon can also  be completely invisible, except for a very faint, blue-tinted aura that looks more like an afterimage left in your vision during and after staring at something bright for too long.
    • In Sucker Demon Sent to Punish Caught on Video, a cloaked sucker demon snakes around my head and then oozes down my neck as I try to capture it with my camera. It looks like all sucker demon's cloak, which looks like a faint, white, cloudy aura.

      NOTE | A special filter-processing technique was used in this video to highlight the cloaked demon, and was also used to highlight another demon in the still frame below; this technique is shown in Blending Quicktime Video Layers to Penetrate Demon Cloaks.

      Fast-motion on the part of the subject and my camera, as well as video-filter post-processing, revealed this cloaked demon in a still frame
    Precautions indicate awareness of vulnerability, limits of cloak
    The fact that virtually no demon can become completely invisible in every situation may be why darkness and black clothing are preferable for travel and other activities; specifically, that preference suggests that they are aware of the limits of their cloak, and that these two precautions are taken due to vulnerability to injury or death (of course, nighttime and black clothing go hand-in-hand with evil activity, too). Also, if cloaking requires concentration of effort, darkness affords them less mental strain.

    Cloaks can enhance, diminish vulnerability in combat
    But, even if they do have a soft-spot to protect, they have no issues with self-confidence, which, by the way, is nothing like bravery, but more like confidence through anger. Still, when fighting, some use their cloak in the approach—not only to launch a surprise attack, but to cause panic in their adversary. Specifically, they will show themselves, aggressively postured, just long enough to convey their deadly intentions; then, using their telepathy, they then cloak themselves the instant you become aware of your perilous circumstance, known that losing sight of a deadly enemy in combat would cause anyone alarm.

    This is more of a compensation, though, for the limits the concentration required to maintain a cloak imposes on a demon's ability to fight effectively.

    The role of light in penetrating a cloak
    Examining the role of light plays is necessary in order to devise ways to penetrate a cloak (i.e., seeing it with your eyes or camera); but, you must first determine the source of the light you see. There are three possible sources:
    1. The cloak is transforming the light that filters through it—that means that you are seeing some light reflecting off the demon;
    2. The cloak is emitting its own light—that means it is comprised of other types of radiation or energy, which could be detected with specialized equipment; or,
    3. Both of these—that means you can get a clearer picture by way of more available light and radiation data.
    NOTE | You will know if a cloak is emitting light if you can also see it in the dark; but, if it appears diminished in brightness (but is otherwise still visible), then you know it both reflects and emits light. 
    Knowing this helps in the detection and visualization of cloaked demons, which may lead to other observations and data needed to develop defenses against physical demonic attack, although, the only way to avoid falling prey to the Devil's schemes is to "hear and obey." [Luke 11:28]

    More later...

    Sucker demon sent to punish caught on video

    Yesterday, I captured a large, cloaked sucker demon slithering down the back of my neck, in order to avoid being caught on camera:


    ALSO:
    DOWNLOAD from DROPBOX
    SEE on VIMEO

    It was sent to burn my head and left eye by the Voices Demons as punishment for not listening: doing things I need to do (such as laundry, grocery shopping, cooking and eating), things I have to do (legal work), things I want to do (hobbyist design and coding), reminiscing about the past, holding hope for the future, and expressing happiness for things present. In general, gratitude is verboten, too, but only if I am grateful for something big. (The Voices Demons just said that "it's not that you're grateful, it's that something good happened to you.")

    I knew it was coming because one of the Voices Demons said that I "needed a whipping with the belt" for refusing to listen to their babbling. (This peculiar choice of words in threatening me is explained in Demons Mock Childhood Abuse Prior to Committing Acts of Violence.)

    Upon hearing this, I immediately grabbed my laptop and pointed its camera at my head. That usually causes them pause; however, not this time.

    Instead, the sucker demon swirled around my head, trying to duck the camera; but, not only was he too large to hide, he wasn't fully cloaked, and so was somewhat visible to the camera.